Playboy to Drop The Nudity — Magazine Will Now Focus on Clothed Women

Share

It was the end of 1953, and 27-year old Hugh Hefner was about to publish the first ever Playboy magazine. Inside the 44-page long magazine was a special guest, Marylyn Monroe, undressed and fully exposed. Hefner had purchased the rights to the photos of Monroe from a calendar printer, and boy was it a good decision.

Little did the Playboy founder know that those first 54,175 copies of the magazine would be a launching point for one of the most recognizable magazines in the world today.

Here we are almost 62 years later, and an 89-year-old Hefner has decided, along with Chief Executive Scott Flanders, to make radical changes to the magazine. Starting in March of 2016, Playboy will no longer be publishing nude photographs of women. Instead, the attractive women which normally grace the pages of the adult magazine will now be portrayed in rather provocative poses, only this time with clothes on, and in a PG-13 manner.p2

The decision comes after last month’s meeting between Flanders, Hefner and others within the company at the Playboy Mansion, where they decided that the free pornography industry found on the internet is too difficult to compete with.

“You’re now one click away from every sex act imaginable for free,” Flanders was quoted as saying. “And so it’s just passe at this juncture.”

Playboy’s circulation continues to erode, dropping to around 800,000 currently. This is a far cry from the circulation of 5.6 million in 1975, telling Hefner that something needed to be done to stem additional losses.

This move follows a similar move by the company’s website, which decided to go nude-free in August of last year. Since then Playboy says their internet readership soared from approximately 4 million unique visits a month to around 16 million, and the average age of their readers fell from 47 to around 30.

“Don’t get me wrong,” said Cory Jones, Playboy’s Chief Content Officer, who was also involved in last month’s meeting with Hefner and Flanders. “Twelve-year-old me is very disappointed in current me. But it’s the right thing to do.”

It will be interesting to see if the print version of the magazine has the same success with its move away from nudity as did Playboy’s website, or if this is the start of the end for the 62-year-old iconic magazine. What are your thoughts?

COMMENTS: